Media library

Here you will find a selection of films regarding the concentration camp Ravensbrück. They also provide an introduction on the main topics of the video archive and further infos on on certain thematical aspects. The videos will open in a separate window. Please note: so far only the film "Remembering Ravensbrueck" is available in an english version - the other films are available in the original german versions.)

Remembering Ravensbrueck
Survivors of the women’s concentration camp testify

A film by Loretta Walz
34 min. / D 1995 / © 1996 Loretta Walz Videoproduktion

Ravensbrueck was the biggest women’s concentration camp during the reign of the German National Socialism. 130.000 women and children, but also 20.000 males were incarcerated in Ravensbrueck between 1938 to 1945. Tens of thousands were murdered. In this introductory film on the camp of Ravensbrueck women are testifying who were arrested on political, religious or racial grounds. 25 women from seven european countries are sharing their memories. They remember some of their experiences in the camp and thus show the great variety of the individual (his)stories of this women’s concentration camp.

German Version
Erinnern an Ravensbrück
überlebende des Frauen-Konzentrationslagers berichten

[Credits]

English Version
Remembering Ravensbrück
Survivors of the women's concentration camp testify

A film by Loretta Walz, Dur.: 34 minutes, Copyright 1996
[Synopsis / Credits]

French Version / Version français
Se souvenir de Ravensbrück
Des survivantes du camp de concentration de femmes parlent

Un film de Loretta Walz, Durée: 34 minutes, Copyright 1996
[Synopsis / Credits]

Lidice - 2 villages 1 place

a film by Waidak Media e.V. with students of the GMOSZ Zehdenick 90 min. D 2013/2014 / © 2014 Waidak Media e.V.

A film about the fate of the Czech village of Lidice, which was completely destroyed and burned to the ground by the Nazis, as a retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich. A class of students began this project by working with interviews from our archive with women from Lidice who were deported to Ravensbrueck. Later on they visited the village and the memorial site (placed on the site of the old, burnt-down village) themselves to conduct their own interviews with some of the survivors, the mayoress a.o. The result is a complex, touching documentary, shedding light onto the precarious heritage of the new, rebuilt village of Lidice, that also shows the working process, the reactions and emotions of the students while diving into the history of Lidice and getting to know some of the survivors of this tragedy. Other subjects of the film are how the new Lidice transformed itself over the last decades, how it dealt with the situation of being treated like a national treasury, while attaing a certain kind of stigma at the same time, and the current relationship btw. the Czech Republic and Germany.

Lidice - 2 villages 1 place

[Detailed Synopsis / Credits]

„In three days we had lost everything“ -
Women from Lidice remember

A film by Loretta Walz, Uta Fröhlich and Eva Pluharová-Grigiene
D 2002; 36 minutes

On the 10th of June 1942, as a retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, the “Deputy Protector of Bohemia and Moravia”, the bohemian village of Lidice was completely destroyed by SS-troops. All the male residents were shot on a farmyard in the village, all the women were deported to Ravensbrück and the children, at first, into a camp in Lódz (Poland). Of the nearly 200 women from Lidice, only two thirds returned to their hometown after the war. Jaroslava Sklenicková, Milada Cábová, Mila Kalibová, Anna Nešporová and Maria Jarošová have survived this tragedy. In this film they offer a very personal account of their experiences

„In three days we had lost everything“ - Women from Lidice remember

[Credits]

„They have called us rabbits“
The medical experiments on polish women in Ravensbrueck

A film by Loretta Walz
D 1995; 55 minutes

Stanislawa Bafia, Maria Plater and Wladyslawa Marczewska are giving an account of their arrest and the time spent in polish Gestapo-prisons. They remember their relief upon hearing of their deportation to Germany. They could not conceive that there could be anything worse than the Gestapo-interrogations. But in the summer of 1942 the medical experiments in Ravensbrück began. Under the guidance of Dr. Karl Gebhardt, head of the “Heilanstalten Hohenlychen”, a sanatorium for wounded german officers, so-called “experimental war-surgery”(“kriegschirurgische Experimente”) was conducted on groups of polish inmates in the sick bay of the concentration camp of Ravensbrück. Only a few inmates survived those operations, in which (a.o. experiments) they were exposed to anti-inflammatory sulfonamides. Today, these types of medicines are in global distribution.

„They have called us rabbits“

[Credits]

Tracing the tracks with Gertrud Pötzinger

A film by Loretta Walz
D 2008; 8 minutes

In 1993, almost 50 years after the end of World War II, Gertrud Pötzinger, a Jehovah’s Witness, visited the Ravensbrück memorial for the first time. She remembers her time of detention in the camp as well as the forced labour, she had to do.

Tracing the tracks with Gertrud Pötzinger

[Credits]

„When I am gone, you’ve got to take over.“
A documentary about Hildegard Schäfer, a survivor of the women’s concentration camp of Ravensbrueck

A film by Loretta Walz
D 2003; 32 minutes

Hildegard Schäfer was born in 1918 in Bad Kreuznach. She was the youngest of eight siblings, raised in quite poor circumstances. The affection for her brother-in-law, grown out of her childhood, would prove fateful for her during the nazi-regime. When, in March 1940, she went to the employment office, looking for work as a chamber-maid or a housekeeper, she was told, the only posts left were in the arms factories. Stating, that she would not support a war against the homeland of her brother-in-law, she refuses to work for the arms industry. She boldly claims: “My sister is married in France, my brother-in-law is in the french army and my brother is in the (german) navy. That’s why I won’t work in an arms factory.” Thereupon she is getting arrested and deported to the women’s concentration camp of Ravensbrueck. “You didn’t have to say much more than that to be out of the picture!”“

„When I am gone, you’ve got to take over.“

[Credits]